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Category Archives: fiction

OOC: Well, I’m a slacker, so instead of more language information, or G-d forbid, an actual narrative story, below the fold you’ll find an explanation of the native Atlantean alphabet.

OOC: I should also take this time to point out that another verbal infix, -thai- has been added to last week’s grammar post.

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The Atlantean Language family appears to have died out completely with the loss of the continent. From the documents secured by the Alba Longan explorer, Tivasis, we can determine that it is completely unrelated to any of the nearby Indo-European, Afro-Asiatic, or Vasconic language families. After the break you will find a brief outline of Kiyatsic grammar. Kiyatsic was chosen due to its conservative nature, meaning its grammar remained very close to the proto language.
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In 1175BC, when the Trojo-Latin scholar/adventurer, Tivasis visited Atlantis for the first time, he recorded two of the four known Atlantean tongues in a modified Greek alphabet. In addition to this, documents survive in the Vatican library of Atlantean texts in a native writing system. Though the two tongues, spoken in the eastern prairies and deciduous forest, are notably different, careful study reveals strong correspondences between the two, making a common ancestor highly likely. Decipherment was aided by the fact that the native Atlantean writing system is a featural system, which means that the shape of the letters encodes phonological information, as opposed to using pictures to represent sounds, as the Phoenicians did. The Linguistics department at Leipzig has reconstructed a hypothesized Proto-Atlantean language which will be outlined below.

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Lecture by Dr. Gunther Schwinghammer, Professor of Archaeology, University of Leipzig
Transcribed and translated by Alain Lefevre, senior fellow at the Paris Institute for Crypto-Archaeology

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Dear Mr. Crowley,

I am pleased to hear of your interest in Sumerian Magical History. I apologize for the delay in this reply, but I was unable to locate the requested information in our library. As such I am indebted to Professors Michel LeFevre of the Catholic University of Paris, and Christopher Higgins of Columbia. I have enclosed their contact information if you wish to correspond directly with them.

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